The many myths behind flying carpets

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If youve heard of Aladdin, theres no doubt youve also heard of magic carpets.

If youve never looked into the topic before, you may be surprised by the extent to which magic carpets have been sensationalised and fabled in the past (a.k.a., pre-Disney) – particularly when it comes to Arabic, French and Slavic folklore.

Stemming from many ancient, storytelling artefacts – including scrolls written by the 13th century Jewish scholar Ben Sherira, and the legendary compendium of tales One Thousand and One Nights – stories about the enchanted object, who it originally belonged to and what its role was, range greatly.

Green, gold and elegant beyond belief (looking something like this, wed wager) it was, according to ancient scholars, tinted with special dye that gave it magnetic properties, enabling it to fly as the earth was supposedly magnetic, too. It was, also, a cool sixty miles long – both widthways and lengthways (a.k.a., a total packaging nightmare).

According to the tale, the King was too distracted to receive Queen Shebas extravagant gift, so pawned it off on his courtiers – the Queen, on receiving the news, was heartbroken, and the art of making magic carpets forgotten. A real shame.

God, apparently, granted King Solomon with a magic carpet to help him fly from Damascus to Media – an air vessel that allegedly fit 40,000 men (Not even our Large Rugs range can do that!). However, Solomon got a little cocky on receiving his present, frustrating God and inspiring him to shake the carpet as it flew, sending all men – including the arrogant King – into the air. Grisly.

(Source: Wikipedia)The history of the magic carpet is colourful, to say the least. If youve heard of Aladdin, theres no doubt youve also heard of magic carpets. If youve never looked into the topic before, you may be surprised by the extent to which magic carpets have been sensationalised and fabled in the past (a.k.a., pre-Disney) particularly when it comes to Arabic, French and Slavic folklore.